UN Secretary-General Aptitude Test

Food for thought!

the ewenited nations

The questions below have been carefully selected for their relevance to the skills necessary to succeed as United Nations Secretary-General. If you can answer these correctly, you may be qualified to serve in the UN’s top post.

Good luck!

1. Order these phrases from weakest to strongest:

a) deeply concerned

b) gravely distressed

c) deeply disturbed

d) seriously concerned

e) gravely alarmed

2. There has just been an attack violating the cessation of hostilities in Country X. You:

a) Urge the parties to put peace above politics.

b) Call for all sides to act with restraint.

c) Appeal to the parties to engage constructively in political dialogue.

d) Call for the international community to follow through on its commitment for humanitarian aid.

e) All of the above.

3. A Médecins Sans Frontières hospital has been bombed in Syria. How many calls for accountability do you as Secretary-General have to make to ensure that someone is punished? 

a) Zero. Targeting…

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Why I won’t be attending a Belgian solidarity rally

Seth J. Frantzman

By SETH J. FRANTZMAN

Around the world there is an outpouring of sympathy in the wake of terror attacks in Belgium that killed 34 and wounded 250. According to the BBC, “many cities around the world illuminated their landmarks in the colours of the Belgian flag in a show of solidarity.”  The Eiffel tower was lit up in the colors of the Belgian flag.

This is the usual ritualized reaction to a terror attack in Europe. After the terror attacks on Charlie Hebdo in January 7, 2015 numerous political leaders marched in Paris.  The Independent noted at the time “there is no precedent for such a mass turnout of world leaders for anything other than a summit or funeral of a leading monarch or statesman.”  It should be recalled that during that march most of the leaders did not arrive because of the related killings at the kosher supermarket, but…

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